Perseids Provide Exciting Show in 2016 – Updated

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Perseid fireball above the lights of Pendleton, Oregon – Credit: Wade Earle
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Resulting persistent train from Perseid fireball – Credit Wade Earle

The Perseids put on a fine show for those who traveled to rural locations to view the show. Observers in the eastern hemisphere successfully observed two outbursts that occurred at 22:40 and 23:24 universal time.* Rates for these short bursts of Perseid activity were estimated to approach 200 per hour but only lasted a fraction of an hour. The main peak, which occurred over the America’s, was estimated to reach a zenith hourly rate near 120 with many bright and colorful meteors. Unlike the short bursts seen over Europe, the main peak lasted many hours centered near 10 Universal Time (3:00am PDT) on August 12. Observers from Florida to California were seeing hourly rates approaching 100 per hour as viewed from dark sky sites. Rates on Saturday morning were still impressive although not as strong as those seen on Friday morning. Bright meteors were continuing to appear even though rates were falling.

The Perseids for 2016 are now essentially over, with only a scattered remnant left to be seen. Unfortunately the display in 2017 will be spoiled by a waning gibbous moon, which will obscure all but the brighter meteors. This will limit hourly rates to 25-50 meteors per hour, depending on the transparency of your sky. These rates are still better than 95% of the other nights of the year so it will be worth giving it a look next year. The maximum is also favorable next year as it falls on a Saturday morning verses a Friday morning this year.

Observations of the Perseids are still arriving and we will add them to the table below as they are received. You are invited to use the “Comments” section to add your Perseid viewing experiences and provide any counts you may have obtained.

* Times provided by Sirko Molau, International Meteor Organization

The table below lists all of the observations received by the American Meteor Society of the Perseid meteor shower as well as meteors from other sources. Information on the abbreviations for each source may be found in past weekly meteor outlooks, available on the main page of this website. All times are listed in Universal Times to avoid the confusion of multiple time zones. To find local times subtract 4 hours for EDT, 5 hours for CDT, 6 hours for MDT, and 7 hours for PDT. Limiting magnitude (LM) is an estimate of the faintest star visible to each observer. The higher the number the fainter the star and the better the sky condition. Sporadic (SPO) are random meteors not associated with any known shower. Anthelion (ANT) meteors are a continuous source of meteors active all year long and therefore separated from the short-lived showers such as the Perseids.

2016 AMS PERSEID OBSERVATIONS

DATE OBSERVER LOC. PERIOD TOTAL L.M. PERCENT TOTAL SPO ANT SHOWER SHOWER
 (UT) TIME (hr.) CLOUDS METEORS
Jul 09 Paul Jones FL 0600-0700 1.00 6.50 0% 22 15 1 2 CAP 2 JPE
2 SCA
0700-0800 1.00 6.50 0% 19 12 0 1 CAN 3 JPE
1 PER 1 PPS
1 SCA
Jul 10 Paul Jones FL 0600-0700 1.00 6.20 10% 13 10 1 1 JPE 1 SCA
0700-0800 1.00 6.20 10% 15 12 0 1 CAN 1 CAP
1 JPE
Terrence Ross TX 0700-0800 1.00 6.17 0% 13 8 0 2 JPE 1 PPS
2 SCA
Paul Jones FL 0800-0900 1.00 6.20 10% 21 14 0 2 JPE 4 PER
1 SCA
Terrence Ross TX 0800-0900 1.00 6.25 0% 21 10 0 1 CAN 2 JPE
1 PER 2 PPS
5 SCA
0900-1000 1.00 6.25 0% 20 7 0 6 CAN 1 JPE
4 PPS 2 SCA
Jul 11 George Gliba WV 0410-0510 1.00 6.40 0% 14 6 2 2 CAP 1 PER
1 PPS 2 PSA
0510-0610 1.00 6.50 0% 15 6 3 1 CAN 2 JPE
2 PPS 1 SCA
Paul Jones FL 0600-0700 1.00 6.50 0% 21 14 0 2 CAN 1 CAP
2 JPE 1 PER
1 SCA
0700-0800 1.00 6.50 0% 25 13 0 2 CAN 3 JPE
5 PER 2 SCA
Terrence Ross TX 0754-0900 1.10 6.23 0% 12 8 0 1 JPE 2 PPS
1 SCA
Jul 14 Paul Jones FL 0700-0800 1.00 6.50 0% 22 10 0 2 CAN 1 CAP
2 JPE 2 PER
2 PPS 2 PSA
1 SCA
0800-0900 1.00 6.50 0% 20 12 0 1 JPE 3 PER
1 PPS 1 PSA
1 SCA 1 SDA
Jul 15 Paul Jones FL 0700-0800 1.00 6.50 0% 22 10 1 1 CAP 1 JPE
2 PER 2 PPS
1 PSA 1 SCA
1 SDA
0800-0900 1.00 6.50 0% 33 16 1 1 CAP 4 JPE
6 PER 2 PPS
1 PSA 2 SDA
Jul 16 Paul Jones FL 0735-0835 1.00 6.50 0% 31 13 1 1 CAP 2 JPE
8 PER 1 PPS
1 PSA 1 SCA
3 SDA
0835-0905 0.50 6.50 0% 16 9 1 CAP 3 PER
2 SDA
Jul 25 Paul Jones FL 0200-0300 1.00 6.50 20% 7 5 1 1 CAP
0300-0400 1.00 6.50 20% 10 6 1 1 CAP 2 SDA
Jul 26 Paul Jones FL 0300-0400 1.00 6.50 35% 12 6 3 1 CAP 1 GDR
1 SDA
Jul 28 Paul Jones FL 0400-0500 1.00 6.20 25% 12 5 2 1 CAP 1 GDR
1 PAU 2 SDA
0537-0637 1.00 6.90 0% 32 7 4 CAP 6 PER
15 SDA
Jul 29 Paul Jones FL 0515-0615 1.00 6.90 0% 24 7 1 1 GDR 1 PAU
1 PER 13 SDA
0615-0715 1.00 6.90 0% 35 9 2 CAP 2 GDR
5 PER 17 SDA
Jul 30 Terrence Ross TX 0456-0556 1.00 6.05 0% 14 3 1 2 CAP 1 JPE
1 PER 6 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0525-0625 1.00 6.90 0% 31 10 3 CAP 1 GDR
4 PER 13 SDA
0625-0725 1.00 6.90 0% 37 12 1 3 CAP 1 GDR
6 PER 14 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0556-0640 0.73 6.05 10% 12 7 1 2 CAP 2 SDA
0725-0825 1.00 6.90 0% 46 12 3 CAP 8 PER
23 SDA
Jul 31 Paul Jones FL 0550-0650 1.00 7.00 0% 41 14 2 3 CAP 4 PER
18 SDA
0625-0725 1.00 7.00 0% 37 11 1 2 CAP 1 GDR
7 PER 15 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0649-0749 1.00 6.25 0% 33 11 1 BPE 5 CAP
1 JPE 1 PAU
2 PER 12 SDA
0749-0900 1.18 6.25 0% 27 7 3 1 BPE 1 PAU
4 PER 11 SDA
Aug 01 Terrence Ross TX 0646-0800 1.23 6.44 0% 45 13 1 3 BPE 6 CAP
2 JPE 1 PAU
9 PER 10 SDA
0800-0900 1.00 6.50 0% 28 5 1 3 BPE 1 ERI
2 JPE 3 PAU
6 PER 7 SDA
Aug 02 Terrence Ross TX 0649-0800 1.18 6.47 0% 37 10 1 1 BPE 2 CAP
2 ERI 1 JPE
2 PAU 4 PER
14 SDA
0800-0900 1.00 6.47 0% 20 3 2 1 BPE 1 ERI
3 JPE 1 PAU
2 PER 7 SDA
Aug 02 Terrence Ross TX 0643-0800 1.28 6.47 0% 23 5 1 2 BPE 2 CAP
8 PER 5 SDA
Robert Togni AR 0745-0815 0.50 2 0 2 PER
Terrence Ross TX 0800-0900 1.00 6.47 0% 31 7 2 1 BPE 1 CAP
1 ERI 4 JPE
1 PAU 5 PER
9 SDA
Aug 03 Paul Jones FL 0725-0825 1.00 6.90 25% 29 10 1 CAP 1 ERI
13 PER 4 SDA
0825-0925 1.00 6.90 0% 31 8 1 CAP 17 PER
5 SDA
Aug 04 Terrence Ross TX 0645-0745 1.00 6.47 0% 34 12 3 2 BPE 1 CAP
1 PAU 6 PER
9 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0725-0825 1.00 6.90 0% 31 8 1 CAP 1 ERI
1 NDA 14 PER
6 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0745-0845 1.00 6.57 0% 27 5 3 BPE 2 ERI
1 PAU 12 PER
4 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0825-0925 1.00 6.90 0% 31 9 2 ERI 1 NDA
14 PER 5 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0845-0920 0.58 6.57 0% 26 3 3 BPE 2 ERI
2 JPE 15 PER
1 SDA
Aug 05 Terrence Ross TX 0642-0742 1.00 6.47 0% 33 10 2 2 BPE 2 CAP
2 JPE 1 PAU
9 PER 5 SDA
0742-0842 1.00 6.57 0% 25 5 2 2 BPE 1 ERI
1 JPE 1 PAU
6 PER 7 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0825-0925 1.00 6.80 0% 50 10 1 CAP 2 ERI
1 NDA 33 PER
3 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0842-0920 0.63 6.57 0% 17 2 1 ERI 1 PAU
8 PER 5 SDA
Aug 06 Terrence Ross TX 0643-0743 1.00 6.47 0% 25 6 1 BPE 1 JPE
3 KCG 8 PER
6 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0715-0815 1.00 VAR 35% 25 5 1 BPE 1 KCG
1 NDA 16 PER
1 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0743-0843 1.00 6.47 0% 24 6 3 BPE 1 ERI
1 JPE 11 PER
2 SDA
0843-0930 0.78 6.47 0% 25 4 3 BPE 4 ERI
2 KCG 9 PER
3 SDA
Aug 07 Paul Jones FL 0725-0825 1.00 6.70 0% 46 9 1 BPE 2 CAP
1 ERI 1 NDA
28 PER 4 SDA
0825-0925 1.00 6.90 0% 39 8 1 BPE 1 ERI
1 NDA 27 PER
1 SDA
Aug 08 Terrence Ross TX 0645-0800 1.25 6.57 0% 22 10 2 1 BPE 8 PER
1 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0725-0825 1.00 6.70 0% 41 9 1 CAP 2 ERI
1 NDA 1 PAU
25 PER 2 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0800-0900 1.00 6.57 0% 41 10 2 2 BPE 2 ERI
1 NDA 2 PAU
20 PER 2 SDA
Paul Jones 0825-0925 1.00 6.90 0% 42 10 1 ERI 1 NDA
28 PER 1 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0900-1000 1.00 6.57 0% 38 10 4 BPE 2 ERI
1 KCG 2 NDA
1 PAU 16 PER
2 SDA
Craig Heden CA 0900-1130 2.50 72 30 42 PER
Aug 09 Terrence Ross TX 0643-0800 1.28  6.47  0% 30 10 1 BPE 1 KCG
2 NDA 1 PAU
12 PER 3 SDA
Lisa Goodwin MA 0757-0828 0.52 24
Terrence Ross TX 0800-0900 1.00  6.47  0% 23 3 2 BPE 2 ERI
1 JPE 3 NDA
1 PAU 10 SDA
1 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0825-0925 1.00 6.90 10% 59 13 4 ERI 2 NDA
38 PER 2 SDA
Terrence Ross TX 0900-1000 1.00  6.47  0% 31 6 4 BPE 1 ERI
2 JPE 1 NDA
1 PAU 16 PER
Craig Heden CA 0900-1100 2.00 54 22 PER
Aug 10 Paul Jones FL 0725-0825 1.00 6.90 0% 55 11 1 ERI 1 KCG
4 NDA 32 PER
6 SDA
0825-0925 1.00 6.90 0% 77 12 3 NDA 57 PER
5 SDA
Craig Heden CA 0900-1100 2.00 42 26 PER
Aug 11 Paul Jones FL 0725-0825 1.00 6.90 0% 71 10 1 1 ERI 1 KCG
4 NDA 49 PER
5 SDA
Robert Lunsford CA 0800-0900 1.00 6.72 0% 30 4 1 ERI 1 KCG
24 PER
Paul Jones FL 0825-0925 1.00 6.90 0% 78 9 3 ERI 65 PER
1 SDA
Robert Lunsford CA 0900-1000 1.00 6.63 0% 41 16 3 ERI 22 PER
Craig Heden CA 0900-1100 2.00 61 40 PER
Robert Lunsford CA 1000-1100 1.00 6.55 0% 43 11 2 BPE 3 ERI
27 PER
1100-1200 1.00 6.40 0% 53 13 3 ERI 37 PER
Aug 12 Alice Stanley VA 0300-0400 1.00 5% 9  9 PER
0400-0500 1.00 14
Paul Jones FL 0400-0500 1.00 6.50 20% 29 6 1 NDA 21 PER
1 SDA
George Gliba WV 0430-0530 1.00 6.40 0% 65 3 3 1 BPE 1 CAP
55 PER 2 SDA
Alice Stanley VA 0500-0600 1.00 35  35 PER
Paul Jones FL 0500-0600 1.00 6.50 20% 56 6 1 KCG 47 PER
2 SDA
George Gliba WV 0530-0630 1.00 6.60 0% 83 5 3 2 BPE 1 KCG
1 NDA 70 PER
1 SDA
Paul Jones FL 0600-0700 1.00 6.50 20% 75 8 1 ERI 63 PER
3 SDA
David Swann OK 0600-0700 1.00 5.00 0% 30 7 23 PER
0700-0800 1.00 5.80 0% 48 6 42 PER
Paul Jones FL 0700-0800 1.00 6.50 20% 93 9 1 1 BPE 1 NDA
78 PER 3 SDA
Robert Lunsford CA 0700-0800 1.00 6.18 0% 31 3 3 25 PER
Robert Togni AR 0715-0817 1.00 5.00 25 1 24 PER
Paul Jones FL 0800-0900 1.00 6.50 20% 110 11 1 BPE 2 ERI
95 PER 1 SDA
Robert Lunsford CA 0800-0900 1.00 6.45 0% 64 3 2 57 PER 2 SDA
Craig Heden CA 0800-1130 3.50 207 148 PER
David Swann OK 0900-0930 0.50 5.80 0% 30 2 28 PER
Paul Jones FL 0900-0930 0.50 6.50 20% 59 5 54 PER
Robert Lunsford CA 0900-1000 1.00 6.50 0% 65 4 1 ERI 60 PER
Carl Hergenrother AZ 0900-1000 1.00 6.28 11% 71 14 57 PER
David Swann OK 1000-1045 0.75 5.80 0% 35 4 31 PER
Carl Hergenrother AZ 1000-1100 1.00 6.27 0% 13 74 PER
Robert Lunsford CA 1000-1100 1.00 6.45 0% 113 12 2 2 ERI 93 PER
4 SDA
1100-1200 1.00 6.27 0% 72 4 1 ERI 67 PER
Aug 13 Paul Jones FL 0600-0700 1.00 7.00 0% 52 6 2 ERI 2 KCG
5 NDA 35 PER
2 SDA
0700-0800 1.00 7.00 0% 57 7 1 NDA 49 PER
Richard Taibi MD 0720-0821 1.02 5.60 0% 32 12 20 PER
0821-0900 0.65 5.55 0% 15 4 11 PER
Craig Heden CA 0830-1030 2.00 106 73 PER
Paul Jones FL 0800-0900 1.00 7.00 0% 82 9 1 ERI 6 NDA
62 PER 2 SDA
0900-0930 0.50 7.00 0% 42 5 37 PER
Aug 14 Paul Jones FL 0725-0825 1.00 7.00 0% 52 9 3 ERI 1 KCG
3 NDA 36 PER
0825-0925 1.00 7.00 0% 49 10 5 ERI 1 NDA
32 PER
Aug 15 Paul Jones FL 0800-0900 1.00 7.00 0% 46 11 2 BPE 1 ERI
3 NDA 29 PER
0900-0930 0.50 7.00 0% 22 6 1 ERI 15 PER
3 NDA 29 PER
Aug 16  Terrence Ross  TX 0948-1100 1.20 5.91 0% 24 12 2 AUR 1 BPE
2 ERI 7 PER

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6 comments

  • Pedro 4 months ago

    I saw a bright green light explode. While I was driving. I made a wish. Guess what I wished for…..to see it again cuz it looked amazing! Not lying

    Reply to Pedro
  • amsadmin 4 months ago

    Perseid Observations August 11 from Southern California

    I woke at 2330 PDT and looked outside at totally overcast skies. I couldn’t have been happier as I knew these low level clouds along the coast would act as a shield and provide me with darker skies from my mountain site some 80km east of San Diego. It took me 30 minutes to load the truck and I was on my way near midnight. The clouds began to break near the 600m marker and by another 300m it was totally clear. I saw my first meteor as I drove past my Alpine site, which has a great southern horizon but a poor northern one. I was driving to the western slopes of Mt. Laguna, overlooking the little town of Pine Valley. When I arrived there were scattered cars where people were hoping to catch a few meteors. The sky was perfectly clear and dark. There was still an obvious light dome 10 degrees high in the NW (Los Angeles). The San Diego light dome was effectively muted by the clouds but still there. The Milky Way could be traced down to about 10 degrees high above it. The eastern portion of the sky was awesome as the hills to the east blocked any light from the desert communities.

    I started counting at 0100 PDT. There was a breeze out of the southeast which made the temperature of 19C seem a bit cooler. A blanket was needed to keep comfortable. The breeze was off and on all morning long. It never was bothersome and probably kept the mosquitoes away as I heard only 1 buzzer all morning long. There as no bothersome dew as the humidity was only 29%. Meteor activity generally increased as the morning progressed. I noticed a dip in the Perseid activity during the second hour but a surge in the sporadic activity made up for that. I was facing due north at an elevation of 50 degrees. The northern radiants were within my field of view plus I could distinguish those strikingly fast meteors shooting northward from Eridanus. The other southern radiants were way behind me so I couldn’t distinguish the activity from the CAP’S, ANT’S, or the SDA’s. Any meteor entering my field of view from the south and southwest was called a sporadic.

    The first meteor of the night was a nice, bright and slow Kappa Cygnid. Unfortunately it would be the only one I would see. The Perseids did not impress me with bright meteors until the last hour before dawn. There were often long gaps in the activity which was frustrating. It just made no sense at times to go 5 and 6 minutes without seeing a meteors under such splendid skies. I kept an eye out for possible beta Perseids and only recorded 2 possible members during my 3rd hour. The most impressive meteor of the night was not the brightest. It only peaked at 2nd magnitude but lasted several seconds as it slowly moved upward from the northern horizon and extinguished in Ursa Minor.

    It was great to get out again under truly dark skies. It had been nearly 4 months since my last opportunity to view from here. The forecast appears promising for tonight so I look forward to seeing many more meteors.

    Robert Lunsford

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  • amsadmin 4 months ago

    August 12 Perseid Observations from Southern California

    During Thursday afternoon there was a surge of tropical moisture into the area. When this moisture rose over the mountains it created towering cumulus clouds. Luckily, this was not a strong surge and these clouds dissipated soon after sundown. The moisture also disrupted the marine layer and the low level stratus that blocked a lot of city lights the night before was not present tonight. When I arrive at my viewing site near 11:30pm PDT, it was full of cars and I was lucky to find my favorite parking site still unoccupied. The traffic driving up the curving mountain road was non-stop most of the night. I usually have only 1-2 cars pass all night long!

    I had to face half-way up toward the south to avoid the headlights. The sky was impressive but there was a layer of haze 20 degrees high in all directions. It was especially bad in the west toward San Diego plus the waxing gibbous moon was in that direction during my first hour of viewing. The humidity was much higher tonight and the limiting magnitude as not quite as good as it had been the previous night. By facing south I could not distinguish the beta Perseids from the much more numerous regular ones. I could have probably seen any kappa Cygnids had they shot my way, but none did.

    The first hour was good considering the moon was still bright for most of it. At 12:42 I saw a bright flash reflected in the back window of my truck. I turned around in time to see a fading Perseid train. The crowd enjoyed that one but really went nuts two minutes later when a slow Anthelion fireball shot through Aquarius and Pisces and disappeared just over the hill toward the east. Now I did catch that meteor and it was awesome! It peaked at an estimated magnitude -8 and actually split in two before extinguishing. The most impressive feature was the strong aqua color and golden sparks that were present.

    Once the moon set near 1am PDT, the activity seemed to kick into high gear. There were moments when 2-3 Perseids were visible within seconds. There were also lulls in the action but rarely did more than 2 minutes pass without seeing a meteor. The second and third hour produced about a Perseid a minute. The fourth really kicked into high gear as 93 Perseids were seen during that hour. It’s interesting to note that the last minute of this hour produced 7 Perseids while the first minute of the next hour produced none! The brightest Perseids of the night, magnitudes -6 and -5, also occurred within two minutes of each other during this strong period.

    Overall, it was the most satisfying Perseid display I have seen since the 1990’s. I was glad to get the time off from work and although I lost two days of wages, it was still well worth it!

    Robert Lunsford

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  • amsadmin 4 months ago

    August 13 Perseid Observations from Maryland

    I was able to watch meteors this morning for an hour and forty minutes. I was amazed how transparent and dark the sky was in Bel Alton! I expected the sky to be hazy due to the heat, but no. I was amazed at the transparent and comparatively ‘dark’ sky I had at this nearly sea level site. It was 79 degrees F and humid, so I expected very hazy conditions. Instead the sky was one of the best I’ve seen from this site in the 10 or so years I’ve been using it for observations.

    The most beautiful and startling fireball of the morning was a -6 that came from behind me as I faced east. I saw the last 30+ degrees of it as it ended near Aries. It seemed slow, about 1.5-2 seconds in duration. It was a pale green with an orange-ish fringe and some sparks that followed its course. It did not leave a long-enduring train. I suspect it was a Capricornid but since that radiant was behind me I could not confirm it. The morning’s yield was 31 Perseids, ranging from -3 to +5 magnitudes. Two of the 31 were -3 fireballs. Sixteen sporadic meteors were seen, ranging from -6 to +5 in magnitude.

    Richard Taibi

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  • amsadmin 4 months ago

    Here’s my Perseids summary report for 6 days, leading up to and including the main event on the 12th-13th.

    Location: Cottonwood, central valley, northern California
    Skies: Unrestricted all nights. Est. Min. magnitude: ~4.5
    Viewing orientation: Facing eastern horizon
    Viewing days 8-07 thru 8-13
    Viewing time start: ~0100 – 0200 LDT (0800-0900 UTC)
    Viewing duration: 2 – 3.5 hrs (day dependent)
    General Comments:
    Max Perseids Zhr occurred 0100-0130 LDT on 8-12. Zhr was ~80 during this time with several fireballs and very bright meteors with visible trails. Note my viewing time appears to have started near the end of the US outburst, so peak Zhr rates were likely higher. After 0200, meteors rates fell off significantly, with fewer fireballs and bright meteors. Note: for all viewing days, maximum activity tended to peak (both sporadics and Perseids) between 0130 and 0300 LDT. Meteors after 0300 trended smaller with fewer bright meteors or meteors with long trails. Brightest meteor seen was a fragmenting bolide @ 0258 on 8-13 which produced a vivid smoke trail with residual blueish afterglow lasting ~30 seconds. This was the only bolide seen, as well as the only one with a luminous afterglow.
    High Sporadic rates noted rates throughout multi-day period, occasionally (twice) seen in minor flurries of 3-4 within ~10 sec. Most tracked S-N, and lesser amounts W-E. Very few N-S or E-W oriented sporadics noted, Several sporadics were very bright with smoke trains, but no residual afterglow. Sporadics also featured most of the more vividly colored meteors including all the greens (3).

    Data summary:
    8-08-16: 0200 – 0430 hrs.
    72 total meteors, 42 Perseids with numerous very bright meteors and 3 fireballs. Sporadic rates elevated. Tracks showed strong S-N tendencies. Observed Perseid activity strongly favoring visual locations south of Perseus… oftentimes beginning and ending near the far southern horizon. Many of the brightest Perseids occurred in this quadrant.
    8-09-16: 0200 – 0400 hrs.
    54 total meteors, 22 Perseids. Trends in location and direction of both sporadic and Perseid meteor remained unchanged from previous night. Overall meteor rate compared to 8-08 decidedly less.
    8-10-16 through 08-11-16: 0200-0400 hrs
    42-61 total meteors, 26-40 Perseids. Same general activity pattern as 8-09, with brightest meteors occurring before 0230 LDT. Zhr slowly diminishing to ~ 20/hr.
    8-12-16 0100-0430 hrs.
    Shower peak 0100 – 0130 (coinciding with the very start of my viewing session)
    207 total meteors, 148 Perseids. Highest Zhr between 0100 and 0200 ~ 80/hr. Zhr then dropped to ~ 50 thereafter. Overall Zhr pretty consistent at 50-60/hr. No other significant outbursts noted, with brief flurries of only 2-3 meteors at a time.
    8-13-16: 0130-0330 hrs
    106 total meteors, 73 Perseids. Zhr steady at ~ 40/hr. Noted a flurry of 8 bright Perseids with 2 fireballs between 0130 and 0215. Additionally, two bright slow-speed sporadics tracking S-N produced long smoke trails but no residual afterglow. One fragmenting Perseid bolide with a observed afterglow of ~ 30 sec. noted at 0258 hrs. Was the brightest meteor seen for the entire week.
    Other notes for the entire week of viewing (12 hrs total):
    # Red meteors: 13
    # Blue meteors: 08
    # Green meteors: 3
    # Fireballs (> -5 Vm): 9
    # Bolides: 1
    # with afterglow: 1

    Craig Heden

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  • amsadmin 4 months ago

    From Mathias, West Virginia we had a nice show of Perseids. From 4:30 to 6:30 UT (12:30 to 2:30 AM EDT), there was a -4 and -3 magnitude fireballs, three -2 magnitude, and seven -1 Perseids. The average Perseid was 1.7 magnitude and left a persistent train. There were 55 Perseids the first hour and 70 the second hour. I should have kept recording as the rates were much higher around 8:00 UT. There were no clouds and the average LM was about 6.5 magnitude.

    George Gliba

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