Report a fireball

You saw something bright and fast? Like a huge shooting star? Report it: it may be a fireball.

Report a Fireball

Latest News

Meteor Activity Outlook for August 13-19, 2022

by - 2

During this period, the moon reaches its last quarter phase on Friday August 19th. At that time the moon is located 90 degrees west of the sun and will rise near midnight local Daylight Saving Time (LDST). This weekend the waning gibbous moon will rise during the early evening hours, only allowing a brief time to view meteor under dark skies between dusk and moon rise.

Meteor Activity Outlook for August 6-12, 2022

During this period, the moon reaches its full phase on Friday August 12th. At that time the moon is located opposite the sun and will lie above the horizon all night long. This weekend the waxing gibbous moon will set during the early morning hours allowing a couple of hours to view meteor activity prior to dawn.

by - Aug 5, 2022 -

Meteor Activity Outlook for July 30-August 5, 2022

During this period, the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Friday August 5th. At that time the moon is located 90 degrees east of the sun and sets 23:30 (on August 4th) Local Daylight Saving Time (LDST). This weekend the waxing crescent moon will set during the early evening hours and will be long gone below the horizon, by the time the more active morning hours arrive.

by - Jul 29, 2022 - 1

Folks, It’s Fireball Season! – Updated

The AMS received over 600 reports and several videos displaying a fireball event that occurred over Indiana and surrounding states on Sunday July 24, 2022, at 10:52 PM CDT. The AMS #2022-4290 event was mainly seen from Texas, but we also received reports from Oklahoma, and Louisiana.

by - Jul 25, 2022 - 8

Latest Major Fireball Events

Everyday, we receive reports about fireballs from all around the world. Here are some of the latest major Fireball Events (with at least 30 reports):

    Browse all events Report a Fireball

    Pending Fireball Reports

    We are currently investigating 205 reports about fireballs seen over MO, ND, NY, VA, CA, TX, OH, NC, MA, ME, PA, GA, MI, NH, CO, TN, DE, IN, MN, NJ, WA, MD, NM, IL, AL, WV, OR, NV, AR, OK, UT, ID, WY, MS, KY, CT, IA, KS, VT, LA and Texas.

    We are also currently investigating 211 reports from Austria, Belgium, Canada, Switzerland, Germany, Spain, France, United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy, Lithuania, Netherlands, New Zealand, Sweden, Slovakia and South Africa.

    Featured Photo

    Dwayne Free
    Credit: Dwayne Free

    Featured Video


    Credit: Yang

    2018 was a pretty good year for AMS

    Other news

    Meteor Activity Outlook for July 9-15, 2022

    by -

    During this period, the moon reaches its full phase on Wednesday July 13th. At that time the moon is located opposite the sun and remains above the horizon all night long. This weekend the waxing gibbous moon will set during the early morning hours, allowing a few hours of observing time under dark skies.

    Meteor Activity Outlook for July 2-8, 2022

    by -

    During this period, the moon reaches its first quarter phase on Thursday July 7th. At that time the moon is located 90 degrees east of the sun and will set near 01:00 local Daylight Saving Time (LDST). This weekend the waxing crescent moon will set during the evening hours and will not interfere with meteor observing during the more active morning hours.

    Meteor Activity Outlook for June 25-July 1, 2022

    by - 1

    During this period, the moon reaches its new phase on Wednesday June 29th. At that time the moon is located near the sun and will be invisible at night. This weekend the waning crescent moon will rise shortly before dawn and will not interfere with meteor observing.

    Meteor Activity Outlook for June 18-24, 2022

    by - 6

    During this period, the moon reaches its last quarter phase on Monday June 20th. At that time the moon is located 90 degrees west of the sun and will rise 01:00 and 02:00 local daylight saving time (on the 21st). This weekend the waning gibbous moon will rise during the early evening hours and will spoil the morning sky as its glare will obscure all but the brighter meteors.

    Some of the images shown on this website may involve HDR technology and as such may not be compatible with either meteor magnitudes or meteor rates obtained by traditional visual or other standard photometric techniques.