Author Archives: Robert Lunsford

About Robert Lunsford

Bob has been interested in the stars as far back as he can recall His first experience with meteors was a biggie, the 1966 Leonid shower. In 1980, a major awaking occurred. He received a sample copy of Meteor News. He was amazed to learn there was a group actually devoted strictly to meteor observing! He joined the group also started to view some of the minor showers list among the pages of Meteor News. Lastly, he was contracted by Springer Publishing in 2007 to write a book on observing meteors. The book is now available and hopefully will be a useful guide to all interested in the enjoyable field of meteor observing. More info about Robert Lunsford →
Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time from 40N Latitude

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Monday December 22th. At this time the moon is located near the sun and cannot be seen at night. Later next week the waxing crescent moon will enter the eveningRead More >

Geminid meteor over Colțești, Romania - ©   Sergiu Bacioiu

Geminid meteor over Colțești, Romania – © Sergiu Bacioiu The week before Christmas is not one usually devoted to meteor observing. That is unfortunate as an obscure shower known as the Ursids reaches maximum activity during this period. It isRead More >

Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time from 40N Latitude

During this period the moon reaches its last quarter phase on Sunday December 14th. At this time the moon rises near midnight local standard time (LST) and will remain in the sky the remainder of the night. Viewing conditions improveRead More >


The Geminid meteor shower is now active and will reach maximum activity on Saturday evening/Sunday morning December 13/14. Activity is currently low with less than 5 meteors per hour appearing from this source.  Rates are usually twice this number butRead More >

Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time from 40N Latitude

During this period the moon reaches its full phase on Saturday December 6th. At this time the moon lies in the sky all night long and obscures all but the brightest meteors. Toward the end of this period the moonRead More >

Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time from 40N Latitude

No matter where you live, the first half of December provides some of the best meteor activity of the year. Unfortunately this year the bright moon will hamper the viewing of this activity. In the northern hemisphere the sporadic ratesRead More >


Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time from 40N Latitude

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Saturday November 22. At this time the moon is invisible at night and will not interfere with meteor observing. As the week progresses the waxing crescent moon will enter theRead More >

Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time

During this period the moon wanes from half illuminated to nearly its new phase. During this entire period the moon is only visible during the morning hours, allowing dark skies prior to midnight. This weekend the waning crescent moon willRead More >

Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time

During this period the moon reaches its last quarter phase on Friday November 14th. At this time the moon is located 90 degrees west of the sun and rises near 2300 (11pm) local standard time (LST) as seen from mid-northernRead More >


2908-2014-heatmap

The American Meteor Society has received over 1100 reports of a bright fireball on Monday evening, November 3, 2014. It was observed over a large portion of the eastern USA stretching from Georgia northward to Ohio. This event occurred nearRead More >

Reports are arriving to the American Meteor Society of a brilliant fireball occurring near 9:36am Central Standard Time (15:35 UT) on November 3, 2014. So far, reports have arrived from the states of Mississippi, Tennessee, Alabama, and Arkansas stating thatRead More >

Radiant Positions at 8pm Local Standard Time

As seen from the northern hemisphere, meteor rates continue to be strong in November. While no major activity is expected this month, the two Taurid radiants plus the Leonids keep the skies active. The addition of strong sporadic rates makeRead More >