11
Jun
2013

Gamma Delphinid Results and Observations

It is now 12 hours after the predicted outburst of the Gamma Delphinids. From all the correspondence received it is apparent that no strong rates were “seen” anywhere. Interestingly enough, recent radio rates have been higher than normal so it remains to be seen whether this is associated with the Gamma Delphinids.

The typical observation received by the AMS this morning mentioned none or perhaps one Gamma Delphinid being seen along with several sporadic (random) meteors and a couple of Anthelion meteors (if they were watching for these meteors too).

Thomas Ashcraft posted the following video of a possible Gamma Delphinid fireball to Meteorobs.

http://vimeo.com/68139353

We also received several pictures of possible Gamma Delphinids:

Credit Jeremy Jackson, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Credit Jeremy Jackson, Fort Wayne, Indiana

Possible point meteor. Credit Bryan

Possible point meteor. Credit Bryan

Credit Jonathan Dalrymple

Credit Jonathan Dalrymple

Credit Rachel Miller

Credit Rachel Miller

971385_10151537614749613_809485925_n

Credit Rachel Miller

Credit Carlos Bella

Credit Carlos Bella

 

Credit Wade Earle

Credit Wade Earle

_MG_7615

Credit Wade Earle

_S1P7986

Credit Wade Earle

Credit Charlie Davis

Credit Charlie Davis

Credit Yuri Beletsky

Credit Yuri Beletsky

j20130611_080022_306

Credit Derek Kuhl

Credit Derek Kuhl

Credit Derek Kuhl

We would like to thank all the observers who have submitted reports this morning: Brandon Pooley CO, Chuck Green AZ, Ian Shive CA, Jerry Chab NE, Stephanie Smith, Jeff Chai WY, Diana FL, Erik Sjoberg MN, Karen Fultz TX, Carol, John Webber MT, Gil CA, Leslie WA, Jill Ebrecht GA, Allan Crosthwaite CA, Bryan WI, Michael Boschat NS, Oscar Fernandez AZ, Erika KS, Terrence Ross TX, Peter Gural MD, Jimmy Mahuron IN, Bob Oldham (Costa Rica), David Swann TX, Salvador Aguirre (Mexico), Mona Rose Lujano CA, Dave Todt OH, Terry Johnson and son AR, Carla Johns CA, Marshall Neal CA, Jonathan Dalrymple CO, Dale Cunningham AZ, Alexandre Amorim (Brazil), Chris Sutton ID, Phil Scordelis CA, Charlie UT, John Heidenreich, Eric Holcomb OR, Pat and Michael, Mark Newberry CO, Bob Hillenbrand FL, Mike Lewinski NM, Pawel Klatka WY, Dayton Prichard OK, Rachel Miller WA, Saul Chernos ON, John LaMuth CA, Steven Swisley CA, Carlos Bella (Brazil), Edward J. NC, Wade Earle, Brain Calvi IN, Elvira Guillen NM, Charlie Davis CO, Austin Reed NC, Jeremy Smith AR, Jay Poindexter, Cecile Cornou (Denmark), Brian Woodworth IL, Jeffrey Knichel MS, Robin Triplett KS, Amy Catching TX, Amy Macias CA, Brian Taylor DE, Paul Campbell TX, John Ballantyne (United Kingdom), Simon Duck NC, Randy Wittrock, Warren Gretz AZ, Derek Kuhl TX, Luke Leal TX, George Gliba WV, Paul Lunsford MD, Ray Wilbur ME, Matt CO, Benjamin Albright, Patrick Gunning CA, Dave Reed ID, Todd Call UT, Karen NM, Jean Hartman WA



We hope that all of you will try again in August and I guarantee you will be more rewarded for your efforts while viewing the annual Perseid meteor shower.

Robert Lunsford

About Robert Lunsford

Bob has been interested in the stars as far back as he can recall His first experience with meteors was a biggie, the 1966 Leonid shower. In 1980, a major awaking occurred. He received a sample copy of Meteor News. He was amazed to learn there was a group actually devoted strictly to meteor observing! He joined the group also started to view some of the minor showers list among the pages of Meteor News. Lastly, he was contracted by Springer Publishing in 2007 to write a book on observing meteors. The book is now available and hopefully will be a useful guide to all interested in the enjoyable field of meteor observing. More info about Robert Lunsford →
3 Responses
  1. VandenHurk says: June 12, 2013 at 7:47 am

    Saw a very bright fireball streaking from northeast to southwest over the ocean at Hunting Beach State Park, SC, about 9-10 last night. Beautiful! Others saw it too.


  2. Ron Teutsch says: June 12, 2013 at 9:43 am

    Yesterday morning one meteor appeared just after 5:00am and this morning one appeared again at the same time next to a constellation whose name escapes me but looks like a cone with a handle pointing north.

    Each object emitted more white light than anything else in the sky for no more than one second and seemed larger than any other.

    The observation was made from within a block of the corner of Yale and Arapaho in Richardson, Tx 75081


  3. I looked for Gamma Delphinids from Plain, WA (47.770186° -120.662612°). The skies were dark and clear.

    I witnessed 4 or 5 meteors from 11:59 PM to 12:06AM, and one more at 12:30AM. I logged these (sloppily) on paper. Most of them appeared near 12:06AM. I would have had better results logging the observations on paper instead of trying to use the camera. Next time I need to set up a better log sheet for counting.

    They were all very short, dim and reddish-brown. Those first 4 meteors were almost certainly Gamma Delphinids. A few of them appeared close to Delphinus. However, there wasn’t enough data to determine a radiant, which was my primary goal of the evening.

    I attempted time-lapse photos with 2 cameras. Although I saw a lot of meteor-like streaks on my images, all of them were very likely satellites. Even the ISS showed up.

    Camera 1 was a Nikon D700 with a 58mm f/1.2 lens, 30 second exposures at ISO 3200, tracking with a telescope, centered at Gamma Delphini. I observed from about 12:00AM to 2:00AM with negative results. A bright street light caused lens flare in many of the the images.

    Camera 2 was a Nikon D90 with an 18mm f/2.8 lens, 30 second exposures at ISO 3200, on a tripod, centered at the Zenith. I observed from about 12:00AM to 2:30AM, with negative results.

    My eye detected almost no activity after 12:30. Just one meteor showing up at 2:42AM.

    Conclusion: When observing Gamma Delphids, don’t blink or you’ll miss them! However I do consider these observations as confirming the June 11th, 1930 observation: yes, they do indeed exist.

    Rick DeWitt
    Mill Creek, Wa


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