Tag Archives for: Meteors

Two meteors in one shot by Stephen Rahn - 08/15/2011

Two meteors in one shot by Stephen Rahn – 08/15/2011 Radiant Positions at 10pm Local Daylight Time Radiant Positions at 1am Local Daylight Time Radiant Positions at 4am Local Daylight Time During this period the moon reaches its first quarterRead More >

Rocky Raybell

For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 7 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 12 for observers viewing from the southern tropics. The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 3 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes…

Rocky Raybell

The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 2 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 3 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.). For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 9 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 13 for observers viewing from…


Radiant Positions at 10pm Local Daylight Saving Time

Radiant Positions at 10pm Local Daylight Saving Time Radiant Positions at 1am Local Daylight Saving Time Radiant Positions at 4am Local Daylight Saving Time May is a fairly slow month for meteor activity. The Eta Aquariids are very active theRead More >

Barry Simmons

The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 2 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 3 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.). For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 9 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 15 for observers viewing from the southern tropics.

Debbie DiCarlo

During this period the moon reaches its new phase on Saturday April 18th. At this time the moon will be located near the sun and will not be visible at night. Next week the waxing crescent moon will enter the evening sky but it will set prior to midnight and will not interfere with viewing during the more active morning hours.


Colleen Gino

The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 3 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 4 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.). For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 7 …

Matthew Moses

The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 1 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 3 for observers viewing from the southern tropics (latitude 25 S.). For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 4 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 6 for observers viewing from the southern tropics.

Matthew Moses

Meteor activity picks up a bit during April as the Lyrids become active during the month. They are active from the 18th through the 25th, with a pronounced maximum on the 23rd. Sporadic rates during April are steady as seen from both hemispheres with southern observers enjoying twice the activity that can be seen from the mid-northern hemisphere.


Jimmy Dahlström.

The estimated total hourly meteor rates for evening observers this week is near 3 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 4 for observers viewing from the southern tropics. For morning observers the estimated total hourly rates should be near 7 for observers situated at mid-northern latitudes and 10 for observers viewing from the southern tropics.

© Ruslan Merzlyakov - Vortex of star trails created using Photoshop - Stenbjerg, Thy National Park, Denmark. March 2015.

During this period the moon will reach its new phase on Friday March 20th. At this time the moon is located near the sun and is invisible at night. This weekend the waning crescent moon will rise during the early morning hours and will interfere with meteor observing if not kept out of ones field of view.

 Meteors and Northern Lights over Snæfellsnes glacier, Iceland – Feb 20th, 2015 – © Diana Robinson (https://www.flickr.com/photos/dianasch/)

During this period the moon will reach its last quarter phase on Friday March 13th. At that time the moon is located 90 degrees west of the sun and rises near 0100 local daylight saving time. This weekend the waning gibbous moon will rise during the late evening hours effectively ruining the remainder of the night for meteor observing…